Tag Archives: Google

Alphabet’s Google acts to comply with EU antitrust order

DMLA has been a member of  Comp for the last few years in support of CEPIC and  EU companies working for a solution to the Google antitrust issue.  It looks like Google is FINALLY coming up with a solution to the anti-competition lawsuit.

It seems like the time is right for the U.S. to revisit the same problems here in our country and help businesses here regain their competitive edge on the internet.

 

The Fight Against Google Continues in the EU

Thanks to our working relationship with CEPIC,  we are kept up-to-date on the latest in the EU fight against Google.  DMLA is been part of ICOMP, which has now joined forces with OIP (Open Internet Project) to bring more pressure on Commissioner Vestager.  There are two related articles to read.  Part of one is below and the link to one from Politico is here.

Welcome to Morning Tech, your beacon of truth when there is fake news around EU’s tech politics and policies.

END OF A EUROPEAN SUCCESS STORY? After a year or so of relative silence, Google’s rivals and opponents are back in the streets, cranking up the pressure on Europe’s Competition Commissioner Margrethe Vestager to act. Last week, it was ICOMP and the Open Internet Project, this week it is Kelkoo tearing into the Shopping case.

The chief executive of Kelkoo, one of Europe’s largest shopping comparison websites, said his firm could go under next year if Vestager doesn’t take serious action in the six-year-old case. “We’ve got to the point where we have nothing left to lose,” Richard Stables told us.

Join the queue, Richard. Foundem, the original complainant, closed its website in December; Yelp announced around that time it was closing its European operations, complainant group ICOMP is pooling its resources with the Open Internet Project, while many other shopping websites have shriveled. And yet Kelkoo’s outburst is significant: It’s a big European player, with a presence in almost two dozen countries and 230 employees.

Rivals add to complaints against Google’s Android

By Nicholas Hirst/Politico

A tech lobby group filed a fresh antitrust complaint against Google with the European Commission, reiterating accusations the U.S. tech giant used its popular mobile operating system to protect its dominance over internet searches.

The Commission already has an ongoing probe into Android examining the issues raised by OIP. If the Commission accepts OIP, whose members include French-German search engine Qwant, as a formal complainant in the Android case, the lobby group would have access certain documents and could provide its views.

The OIP also announced Tuesday that it was integrating 20-plus companies from the Initiative for a Competitive Online Marketplace, a long-standing anti-Google group that is closing.

It used a press conference to criticize the length of the Commission’s probe into Google and to call on enforcers to impose “interim measures,” which could require Google to change its conduct pending a final decision. It also accused Google of acting in “bad faith.”

Google did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

OIP’s members include German publishers Axel Springer (a co-owner of POLITICO in Europe) and Hubert Burda Media, Qwant, the French search engine in which Axel Springer has a stake, French shopping website leGuide.com, U.S. photo agency Getty Images, and German broadcaster ProSiebenSat.1.

To view online

Kelkoo CEO: Google is ‘screwing’ entire online shopping industry

From Politico

— By Nicholas Hirst

The head of one of Europe’s leading price comparison websites, Kelkoo, said it’s in danger of going under next year unless the European Commission takes market-stabilizing action in its six-year case against Google Shopping.

“We might not even survive another 18 months if there is not a decision soon,” Richard Stables, Kelkoo’s chief executive, warned in an interview Tuesday.

Stables accused Google of willfully destroying a series of budding online businesses and threatening to demote rivals that objected. Foundem, the first shopping website to formally complain about Google to the Commission, closed in December.

“This is about Google screwing over an entire industry and actually really hurting consumers,” added Stables, who said he decided to speak out because “we have got to the point where we have nothing left to lose.”

However, he said it was up to the Commission to decide what solutions would restore fair competition.

Google did not respond to a request for comment, but has vigorously resisted the Commission’s accusations it hurt competition. The Commission could not immediately be reached for comment.

The Commission opened its investigation in November 2010 and formally accused Google of hurting competition in the online price comparison space in 2015. The charges were updated last year. Margrethe Vestager, the commissioner for competition, told the European Parliament last month she was doing her “utmost” to wrap up the probe.

Citing documents released erroneously by the U.S. Federal Trade Commission, Stables said Google had pursued a strategy to eliminate emerging rivals like Kelkoo since as far back as 2004. That included demoting comparison shopping websites in Google search results and luring away advertisers with the promise that they would appear in Google’s product search for free — only for Google to start charging once they had seized the market, Stables claims.

Stables also said Kelkoo’s subsidiary LeGuide had objected to Google scraping content like reviews. He claims Google responded that it would push the site down its search results if LeGuide resisted.

The price comparison sector has struggled over the past decade, forcing companies to sell off divisions and rivals to consolidate and stay afloat. After being snapped up for large sums, European websites Kelkoo, Ciao and LeGuide were sold. All are now managed under the Kelkoo umbrella by a U.K. investment group and employ about 230 people in Europe.

The company’s online shopping revenue continues to decline and time is running out.

Related stories on these topics: CompetitionDigital IndustryGoogleMediaOnline shoppingStartups

 

 

 

 

Getty’s Open Letter to U.S. Senators

logo-GettyImages

 

DMLA Member Getty Images has written an Open Letter to U.S. Senators regarding Google’s anti-competitive practice of image scraping.  This policy change on the part of Google was implemented in 2013 and greatly impacts anyone who displays images on the internet.

Getty is asking for support from visual associations and image licensing companies, as well as the photographers that we represent.  We ask you to read the letter and if you agree with it, please add your name.

You can read the letter here.

Google Responds to EU’s Antitrust Case

From ICOMP’s Blog:

Google in Denial

Today’s blog post from Google is, unfortunately, simply another attempt to divert attention away from the devastating impact their self-preferencing has had on the online market, making many of the same old arguments we have seen before.

Commissioner Vestager has been clear that in her view Google’s systematic self preferencing of its own comparison shopping service, along with its demotion of rivals, is in breach of European antitrust rules. But, in spite of the detailed work and analysis of the Commission and others over many years, Google still refuses to acknowledge the impact of its anti-competitive conduct.

If Google truly believes “in the interest of promoting user choice and open competition”, and in the strengths of its arguments, we would urge them to make their case in front of the Commission and complainants at an oral hearing.

The decision is in Google’s hands, but holding a hearing could provide a unique opportunity for Google to present its full defence and for complainants and other interested third parties to offer their perspectives. We have long believed that transparency and a meaningful debate is in everyone’s best interest, and an oral hearing is an important step in ensuring that such a debate takes place.

We look forward to supporting the Commission in taking the case forward and helping to find robust and workable long-term solutions to remedy the harms caused by Google’s anti-competitive practices. ICOMP’s members, who represent a wide range of interests in the digital sphere, will be keen to ensure that effective remedies are speedily reached.

See the whole story on Politico here

**DMLA is a member of ICOMP

Europe to accuse Google of illegally abusing its dominance

Financial Times
By Alex Barker, Christian Oliver and Anne-Sylvaine
April 14, 2015, 2:01pm ET

Google will on Wednesday be accused by Brussels of illegally abusing its dominance of search in Europe, a step that ultimately could force it to fundamentally change its business model and pay hefty fines.

Margrethe Vestager, the EU’s competition commissioner, is to say that the US group will soon be served with a formal charge sheet alleging that it breached antitrust rules by diverting traffic from rivals in order to favour its in-house services, according to two people familiar with the case.

Serving Google with a so-called statement of objections will be the opening salvo in one of the defining antitrust cases of the internet era. It could prove as epic as the decade-long battle with Microsoft that ultimately cost the company more than €2bn in fines.

The commission’s move comes after a torrid a five-year investigation that Google came close to settling without charges last year. The draft deal collapsed after fierce objections were raised by ministers in France and Germany, and by some of the continent’s most powerful telecoms and media groups.

The EU’s antitrust case comes against the backdrop of a growing European backlash against Silicon Valley and the economic disruption of the digital age. Once lauded for their innovative spirit, big US tech groups have come under mounting criticism in Europe over their market dominance and the way they handle personal data, especially in the wake of the US internet surveillance scandal.

A decision on charges is to be taken by the college of 28 EU commissioners on Wednesday. Some commissioners are concerned that Ms Vestager has, according to one source, restructured and narrowed the case she inherited from her predecessor Joaquín Almunia. As well as search issues, the investigation has looked at allegations that Google illegally scrapes content from rivals, locks in some publishers into using Google search ads, and makes it hard for advertisers to move campaigns to rival search engines.

Although Google has faced antitrust questions on three continents for several years, the EU move is the first time the company has been accused of formal wrongdoing. It will be given 10 weeks to respond to the allegations and will have the opportunity to call a hearing to make its defence.

Ultimately, the commission has the power to levy fines of up to 10 per cent of Google’s global turnover and can impose far-reaching curbs on its business practices. Almost 20 complainants against Google want the search engine to abide by strict rules that ensure its formula treats its own services — providing results for travel, shopping, and maps — no differently from rivals. Spokespeople for Google and the commission declined to comment.

If the charges are proven, it could take at least a year and probably significantly longer for the commission to make a final decision. Google would probably challenge any ruling that goes against it through the European courts, opening a legal war that could run for years.

The commission’s long attempt to settle the case with Google under Ms Vestager’s predecessor Mr Almunia made it one of the most fraught and politically charged antitrust cases to be dealt with by Brussels.

Google supporters feel the commission’s volte-face on a settlement reflected politics rather than an independent assessment. No EU antitrust case has ever been extended to three settlement offers, or been revived after complainants were formally warned that their case is about to be rejected.

On top of the pressure from Brussels, this week Google is also under scrutiny in France where lawmakers are considering an initiative that would force it to hand over its secret formula for ranking websites.

Revealing our algorithms — our intellectual property — would lead to the gaming of our results, which would be a bad experience for users
– Google

The French senate is likely to adopt a bill this week which would allow the country’s national telecoms regulator to monitor search engines’ algorithms, with sweeping powers to ensure its results are fair and non-discriminatory. The French initiative will become law only if it is adopted by the senate and the lower house of parliament and will also require government backing.

Critics complain that Google’s algorithm can be skewed to hurt rivals and want it published to ensure accountability. Google argues such transparency would make its search engine a target of spam and hand rivals its business secrets for free.

A spokesperson for Google in France said: “We’re transparent about what ranks well on Google, including when we make changes, but by definition, not everyone can come top. Revealing our algorithms — our intellectual property — would lead to the gaming of our results, which would be a bad experience for users.”

The amendment, proposed by centre-right lawmakers and attached to a broader economic reform bill assembled by economy minister Emmanuel Macron, has yet to secure the government backing needed to survive the legislative process and pass in the National Assembly.

But Catherine Morin-Desailly, chair of the Senate’s culture, education and communication committee, told the Financial Times that discussions with the government were encouraging.

“The government is well aware of the issues,” Ms Morin-Desailly said. “It’s a question of ensuring fairness. Too many businesses view search engines as bottlenecks. The net is tightening around [Google].”

If approved, the proposal would give Arcep, France’s telecoms regulator, oversight of any search engine that has sufficient power to “structure the functioning of the digital economy”. Google would be required to provide links to at least three rival search engines on its homepage, and disclose to users the “general principles of ranking”.

Additional reporting by Richard Waters in San Francisco

Kurt Sutter Attacks Google

Kurt Sutter Attacks Google: Stop Profiting from Piracy (Guest Column) in Variety

In a very frank article in Variety, Kurt Sutter, executive producer of the FX drama series “Sons Anarchy” talks about how Google is misrepresenting the truth about piracy and copyright laws.  He says they systematically destroying the future of artists by spending tens of millions of dollars each year on eroding creative copyright laws.

Read the entire article here.

PACA and other international trade associations have been actively involved in IComp, an industry initiative for organizations and businesses involved in Internet commerce, which is working to stop some of Google’s practices, but we need the support of our members and the U.S. Congress.  We applaud the EU and their ongoing efforts against Google.

 

EU May Revise Google’s Antitrust Settlement, Says Source

By Tom Fairless  from the Wall Street Journal

European Union antitrust regulators are preparing to step up their investigations into Google Inc. on several fronts, including revisiting a proposed settlement over its search-engine practices that has met with unprecedented opposition.

The European Commission is likely to revise some terms of the proposed settlement with Google that were announced in February.

BRUSSELS—European Union antitrust regulators are preparing to step up their investigations into Google Inc. on several fronts, including revisiting a proposed settlement over its search-engine practices that has met with unprecedented opposition.

The European Commission is likely to revise some terms of the proposed settlement announced in February, aimed at dealing with concerns that the company abuses its dominance of online searches in Europe, a person with knowledge of the situation said Tuesday.

A firm decision on whether to revise Google’s proposed commitments will be made in September, the person said.

The admission marks something of an about-face for EU competition chief Joaquín Almunia, who had previously insisted that the commitments agreed by Google were sufficient to meet the EU’s competition concerns.

A final decision on the case may now be taken by Mr. Almunia’s successor after he leaves office in November, the person said.

The European Commission is also deepening a second line of investigation into Google’s business practices relating to its Android operating system for mobile phones. The Commission recently sent out fresh requests for information from handset makers and other interested parties on their dealings with Android, a year after sending out a first batch of questionnaires, the person said.

The Android inquiry isn’t yet a formal investigation, but it is likely to become one, the person said.

The decision to deepen the investigation follows intense opposition to the Commission’s proposed search settlement with Google, both from top European politicians and the companies it was supposed to help. Some of the companies that lodged complaints against Google have said they would prefer no deal to the one negotiated by Mr. Almunia.

The Commission has decided that some concerns raised by complainants in response to letters explaining the EU’s settlement decision may be valid, the person said.

The concerns relate to the possible preferential treatment of Google’s services beyond their visibility on the search page, and the design of an auction mechanism aimed at allowing rivals to bid for better placement on the page. Some new complaints may also be integrated into the case that weren’t previously linked to it, the person said.

A spokesman for Google referred to previous comments that the company has made “significant changes to address the Commission’s concerns, greatly increasing the visibility of rival services and addressing other specific issues.”